We are the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group. Our mission is to stop the spread of counterfeit golf products, and “Keep Golf Real.” If you have been redirected to this page, it is because the website you were attempting to visit violated federal law by selling and distributing counterfeit golf products. It has been shut down by a court order.

Please take a few moments to review this website for more information on how you can avoid purchasing counterfeit golf products and help to “Keep Golf Real.”

WHO WE ARE

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group is dedicated to stopping the production, distribution and sale of counterfeit or fake golf equipment across the globe. Formed in 2004, the group is made up of six of the largest golf manufacturers in the world: Acushnet Company, whose brands are Titleist, FootJoy, Vokey Design and Scotty Cameron; Callaway-Odyssey; Srixon, Cleveland Golf and XXIO; PING; PXG and TaylorMade Golf.

These manufacturers came together to protect the integrity of the game and to protect the consumers they’ve served for so many years.

The group works internationally with law enforcement and government agencies to identify and eliminate counterfeit operations while simultaneously working to raise consumer awareness of the issue.

This isn’t a brand issue; it’s an honesty issue, it’s a quality issue, and in some cases, it’s a safety issue. For the good of customers and for the good of the game, the group is committed to putting an end to these fakes — because fake clubs are for fake golfers.

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group is dedicated to stopping the production, distribution and sale of counterfeit or fake golf equipment across the globe. Formed in 2004, the group is made up of six of the largest golf manufacturers in the world: Acushnet Company, whose brands are Titleist, FootJoy and Scotty Cameron; Callaway-Odyssey; Srixon, Cleveland Golf and XXIO; PING; PXG and TaylorMade Golf.

These manufacturers came together to protect the integrity of the game and to protect the consumers they’ve served for so many years.

The group works internationally with law enforcement and government agencies to identify and eliminate counterfeit operations while simultaneously working to raise consumer awareness of the issue.

This isn’t a brand issue; it’s an honesty issue, it’s a quality issue, and in some cases, it’s a safety issue. For the good of customers and for the good of the game, the group is committed to putting an end to these fakes — because fake clubs are for fake golfers.

COUNTERFEIT PROBLEM

It’s estimated that as many as 2 million counterfeit golf clubs are produced each year. If you laid every fake club end-to-end they would stretch from Bethpage Black to Pebble Beach and back again. That’s more than 5000 miles. And that doesn’t even consider the millions of fake balls, bags, gloves, and apparel produced.

It’s a major problem.

The growth of the internet and auction sites has led to an increase in the sale of counterfeit products over the last decade. As a result, consumers mistakenly spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year on fakes. The efforts of the group have led to raids and seizures of millions of counterfeit clubs, but there is still considerable work left to do.

It’s estimated that as many as 2 million counterfeit golf clubs are produced each year. If you laid every fake club end-to-end they would stretch from Bethpage Black to Pebble Beach and back again. That’s more than 5000 miles. And that doesn’t even consider the millions of fake balls, bags, gloves, and apparel produced.

It’s a major problem.

The growth of the internet and auction sites has led to an increase in the sale of counterfeit products over the last decade. As a result, consumers mistakenly spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year on fakes. The efforts of the group have led to raids and seizures of millions of counterfeit clubs, but there is still considerable work left to do.

 SPOTTING A FAKE

Counterfeit clubs can result in anything from a loss of distance and accuracy, to safety hazards – with shafts that shatter and heads that fly off mid-swing.

Some golfers look online and see what they think are top of the line clubs at bottom barrel prices so they buy them. But as the old adage goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

The most reliable way to be sure someone is purchasing an authentic product is to buy from an authorized retailer. There will always be a risk that a product purchased from an unauthorized source will be counterfeit. The truth is: counterfeit manufacturers are constantly changing, and it’s becoming more difficult to spot fakes – until you play with them.

To ensure the golf equipment you’re buying, or have already bought, is authentic, ask yourself the following questions:

Am I purchasing golf equipment from an authorized dealer?
A list of authorized retailers can be found on each manufacturer’s website, or by contacting the manufacturer’s customer service department.

Some websites offer discounted golf products and claim to be OEM’s or approved vendors. Are they legit?
Probably not. If the site is not identified as an authorized retailer or vendor according to the manufacturer’s website, it is likely selling counterfeit products. Websites that offer discounted products may be selling fakes. These sites are mainly based in China.

There are slight differences in the appearance of the club, including different shades of color or slightly different engravings. Did I purchase a fake?
Most likely. Most golf manufacturers don’t sell “blems” or “seconds,” so there won’t be different versions of golf equipment in the marketplace.

The golf club that I purchased online was shipped from China. Should I be concerned?
Yes, if the product is shipped from China, the chances are high that it’s a fake.

WHEN IN DOUBT, DON’T BUY IT! SAVE YOUR GAME!

Counterfeit clubs can result in anything from a loss of distance and accuracy, to safety hazards – with shafts that shatter and heads that fly off mid-swing.

Some golfers look online and see what they think are top of the line clubs at bottom barrel prices so they buy them. But as the old adage goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

The most reliable way to be sure someone is purchasing an authentic product is to buy from an authorized retailer. There will always be a risk that a product purchased from an unauthorized source will be counterfeit. The truth is: counterfeit manufacturers are constantly changing, and it’s becoming more difficult to spot fakes – until you play with them.

To ensure the golf equipment you’re buying, or have already bought, is authentic, ask yourself the following questions:

Am I purchasing golf equipment from an authorized dealer?
A list of authorized retailers can be found on each manufacturer’s website, or by contacting the manufacturer’s customer service department.

Some websites offer discounted golf products and claim to be OEM’s or approved vendors. Are they legit?
Probably not. If the site is not identified as an authorized retailer or vendor according to the manufacturer’s website, it is likely selling counterfeit products. Websites that offer discounted products may be selling fakes. These sites are mainly based in China.

There are slight differences in the appearance of the club, including different shades of color or slightly different engravings. Did I purchase a fake?
Most likely. Most golf manufacturers don’t sell “blems” or “seconds,” so there won’t be different versions of golf equipment in the marketplace.

The golf club that I purchased online was shipped from China. Should I be concerned?
Yes, if the product is shipped from China, the chances are high that it’s a fake.

WHEN IN DOUBT, DON’T BUY IT! SAVE YOUR GAME!

CAN YOU SPOT THE FAKE?

Spot Fake 1

It’s becoming more and more difficult to spot counterfeit products just by looking at them. Counterfeiters are constantly changing, and there isn’t one giveaway that indicates whether a product is fake. Scroll through to see if you can identify which of these products are counterfeits.

Spot Fake 2

Scotty Cameron putters are frequently counterfeited. In this case, shoddy paint jobs and poor engraving are two indicators of these fake products. Both putters are counterfeits.

Spot Fake 4

You have to look closely at these Callaway drivers to see the very subtle differences between the two. Notice the different screws used to connect the shaft and the head? How about the slight difference in the center weight? In this picture, the real product is on the left, and the club on the right is counterfeit.

Spot Fake 5

When place side-by-side, the differences in these PING drivers are clear, but which one is real? The driver on the left is the only one of the three that features a matching shaft and club head. The colors on the other two are different, and those two are fake.

Spot Fake 9

These XXIO drivers are almost identical, except in a couple places. The “10.5” and “XXIO” engravings differ in thickness and sharpness. The real product is on the right, but it’s often difficult to see these differences if you’re buying online or don’t have a side-by-side comparison.

Spot Fake 10

When cut in half, counterfeit clubs often reveal their true colors. The real irons, on the left, are partially hollowed out based on technical specifications and quality standards of professionally manufactured clubs. But how often do you get to cut your clubs in half to find out what’s inside?

Spot Fake 3

It’s not only clubs; counterfeiters will manufacture anything if they think they can make money from it. The real golf balls are on the right, and feature a uniform, multi-layer core. The balls on the left are unbalanced, and the material is far from professional grade.

NEWS & CONTENT

NEWS

Group’s New Monitoring Efforts Take Down Online Counterfeit Sellers

June 7, 2017

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group released the results of the first year of the group’s Online Monitoring Program, which was launched in June of 2016 to crack down on criminals selling counterfeit products on select e-commerce websites.  As a direct result of the program, there was a significant decline in the overall number of counterfeit listings on Taobao, a subsidiary of Alibaba.

Read More >>

TaylorMade and PXG Join Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group

January 25, 2017

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced the addition of two members to the growing roster of golf manufacturers joining forces to help stop the spread of counterfeit golf products.  TaylorMade Golf and Parsons Xtreme Golf (PXG) join the current members to represent 11 of the golf industry’s most popular brands.

Read More >>

1 in 5 Americans Believe the Quality of Counterfeit Products is the Same as Real Products

November 1, 2016

An alarming 1 in 5 Americans (22 percent) said they believe the quality of counterfeit products is often the same as the quality of real products, according to a survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group.  The survey highlighted several key gaps in Americans’ perceptions of counterfeit products in the golf world and beyond.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Crackdown on Fakes with Raid of Chinese Factory

July 12, 2016

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced the completion of a successful raid of a counterfeiting factory in Tangxia, China.  Authorities seized 1,169 counterfeit golf products including clubs, club heads and golf bags.  The raid is the latest successful shutdown of efforts to produce, distribute and sell counterfeit golf products worldwide.

 

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Fight Against Fakes in 2015

July 28, 2015

In its second decade of working with law enforcement to limit the spread of counterfeit golf products, the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group experienced strong successes in the first half of 2015 collaborating with Chinese officials to conduct five raids and witnessing the sentencing of several convicted counterfeiters.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Nets Nearly 150,000 Fakes in Milestone 2014

January 12, 2015

The Golf Group enters 2015 having exceeded a milestone of 1 million fake products seized by governmental officials over the last decade.  Last year, Chinese authorities confiscated 150,000 golf items, most recently seizing nearly 400 counterfeit products in Tangxia.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Crackdown Against Fakes in China

August 12, 2014

The Golf Group announced today the successful raids of two China-based counterfeiting targets.  The operations resulted in the seizure of almost 62,000 counterfeit golf products.  Additionally, the Golf Group announced the sentencing of two criminals charged and convicted of selling fakes in a separate case.

Read More >>

Nearly 90,000 Fakes Seized in Latest Efforts by Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group

June 30, 2014

The Golf Group announced today the successful raids of five China-based counterfeiting targets carried out over the past month.  The executions resulted in the seizure of nearly 90,000 counterfeit golf products and continued momentum that the Golf Group and Chinese authorities have built toward stopping the spread of fakes.

Read More >>

Golf Group Efforts Lead to Significant Sentences in Ongoing Fight Against Fakes

May 21, 2014

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced today the convictions and sentences of seven men charged with manufacturing and selling counterfeit golf products, another critical step toward enforcing anti-counterfeiting laws.  The Chinese court system handed down the sentences in two separate court cases last week.

Read More >>

CONTENT

Counterfeiting Featured on Golf Channel

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group was featured on the Golf Channel series “In Play with Jimmy Roberts.”

Group Releases Counterfeit Raid Footage

Exclusive video from a 2015 raid in China, giving consumers a behind the scenes look at a counterfeit raid for the first time.

 

Group Profiled in Philadelphia Business Journal

July 14, 2017

Wayne Mack, attorney for the group, shines light on the illegal counterfeit golf product issue.  He discusses the mission and success of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group.

Read More >>

FOX Denver Discusses Counterfeiting

July 11, 2017

Joe Nauman from The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group explains to FOX Denver some of the differences between real and fake golf clubs and why the counterfeit issue is such a big deal.

Read More >>

Golf Industry Insights: Part 2 of a Panel Discussion

February 24, 2016

The second part of the panel discussion featuring members of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group, where the group discussed the relationship between consumers and counterfeits.

Read More >>

Golf Industry Insights: Part 1 of a Panel Discussion

February 10, 2016

Members of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group recently joined a panel discussion, where they spoke about their efforts over the last 10+ years and about the future of the industry’s fight against fakes.

Read More >>

NEWS

Group’s New Monitoring Efforts Take Down Online Counterfeit Sellers

June 7, 2017

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group released the results of the first year of the group’s Online Monitoring Program, which was launched in June of 2016 to crack down on criminals selling counterfeit products on select e-commerce websites.  As a direct result of the program, there was a significant decline in the overall number of counterfeit listings on Taobao, a subsidiary of Alibaba.

Read More >>

TaylorMade and PXG Join Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group

January 25, 2017

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced the addition of two members to the growing roster of golf manufacturers joining forces to help stop the spread of counterfeit golf products.  TaylorMade Golf and Parsons Xtreme Golf (PXG) join the current members to represent 11 of the golf industry’s most popular brands.

Read More >>

1 in 5 Americans Believe the Quality of Counterfeit Products is the Same as Real Products

November 1, 2016

An alarming 1 in 5 Americans (22 percent) said they believe the quality of counterfeit products is often the same as the quality of real products, according to a survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group.  The survey highlighted several key gaps in Americans’ perceptions of counterfeit products in the golf world and beyond.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Crackdown on Fakes with Raid of Chinese Factory

July 12, 2016

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced the completion of a successful raid of a counterfeiting factory in Tangxia, China.  Authorities seized 1,169 counterfeit golf products including clubs, club heads and golf bags.  The raid is the latest successful shutdown of efforts to produce, distribute and sell counterfeit golf products worldwide.

 

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Fight Against Fakes in 2015

July 28, 2015

In its second decade of working with law enforcement to limit the spread of counterfeit golf products, the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group experienced strong successes in the first half of 2015 collaborating with Chinese officials to conduct five raids and witnessing the sentencing of several convicted counterfeiters.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Nets Nearly 150,000 Fakes in Milestone 2014

January 12, 2015

The Golf Group enters 2015 having exceeded a milestone of 1 million fake products seized by governmental officials over the last decade.  Last year, Chinese authorities confiscated 150,000 golf items, most recently seizing nearly 400 counterfeit products in Tangxia.

Read More >>

Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group Continues Crackdown Against Fakes in China

August 12, 2014

The Golf Group announced today the successful raids of two China-based counterfeiting targets.  The operations resulted in the seizure of almost 62,000 counterfeit golf products.  Additionally, the Golf Group announced the sentencing of two criminals charged and convicted of selling fakes in a separate case.

Read More >>

Nearly 90,000 Fakes Seized in Latest Efforts by Golf Anti-Counterfeiting Group

June 30, 2014

The Golf Group announced today the successful raids of five China-based counterfeiting targets carried out over the past month.  The executions resulted in the seizure of nearly 90,000 counterfeit golf products and continued momentum that the Golf Group and Chinese authorities have built toward stopping the spread of fakes.

Read More >>

Golf Group Efforts Lead to Significant Sentences in Ongoing Fight Against Fakes

May 21, 2014

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group announced today the convictions and sentences of seven men charged with manufacturing and selling counterfeit golf products, another critical step toward enforcing anti-counterfeiting laws.  The Chinese court system handed down the sentences in two separate court cases last week.

Read More >>

CONTENT

Counterfeiting Featured on Golf Channel

The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group was featured on the Golf Channel series “In Play with Jimmy Roberts.”

Group Releases Counterfeit Raid Footage

Exclusive video from a 2015 raid in China, giving consumers a behind the scenes look at a counterfeit raid for the first time.

 

Group Profiled in Philadelphia Business Journal

July 14, 2017

Wayne Mack, attorney for the group, shines light on the illegal counterfeit golf product issue.  He discusses the mission and success of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group.

Read More >>

FOX Denver Discusses Counterfeiting

July 11, 2017

Joe Nauman from The U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group explains to FOX Denver some of the differences between real and fake golf clubs and why the counterfeit issue is such a big deal.

Read More >>

Golf Industry Insights: Part 2 of a Panel Discussion

February 24, 2016

The second part of the panel discussion featuring members of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group, where the group discussed the relationship between consumers and counterfeits.

Read More >>

Golf Industry Insights: Part 1 of a Panel Discussion

February 10, 2016

Members of the U.S. Golf Manufacturers Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group recently joined a panel discussion, where they spoke about their efforts over the last 10+ years and about the future of the industry’s fight against fakes.

Read More >>

SHARE YOUR CONTERFEIT STORY

“I recently purchased two single irons 3 and 4 that were supposedly legitimate from a website. After hitting them today I can safely say they aren’t the real deal. It’s so disappointing. I really want to buy a complete set but saw this as a chance to chip away at getting a whole set. I’m sick of these counterfeiters making money off of people like this.”

-Steve

“I purchased a set of irons online a year ago that were supposedly legitimate. I thought I got a great deal, but when they arrived and I opened the box, I instantly realized they were fake. It definitely wasn’t the best deal I thought it would be.”

-Ben

“My nephew was about to buy some clubs from an online store, but the website had no contact address or phone number. And when you clicked the email link, it defaulted to a different company email address. When I went to that website I was redirected to your site. Because of you guys my nephew didn’t get stuck with fake golf clubs. Keep up the good work! Thanks.”

-Michael

“A few years ago, I bought a driver from a website as a gift for my husband. At the time I thought I was getting a steal of a deal. When I got it in the mail I was so excited to give it to him and when I did he was ecstatic. But when he went to play in a small tournament, he swung the club and the head flew off! I was so disappointed that I had bought my husband a fake club and it still irritates me to this day. So I just wanted to say, thank you doing what you do and shutting down websites like the one I ordered from. You have saved so many people from this frustration!”

-S.L.

I’ve been looking for a certain set of irons on various discount golf club websites and came across a website closed down by your group. I found it very helpful and it confirmed what was in the back of my mind; if it’s too good to be true then it probably is. Thanks for being on the lookout for these rogue sites. I’ll only buy from an authorized dealer now.

Paul

Share your counterfeit story by emailing us at
keepgolfreal@gmail.com

* By sharing your story with us you consent to allow us to use details of this story and your first name in order to help educate other consumers on the dangers of counterfeit golf products.

“I recently purchased two single irons 3 and 4 that were supposedly legitimate from a website. After hitting them today I can safely say they aren’t the real deal. It’s so disappointing. I really want to buy a complete set but saw this as a chance to chip away at getting a whole set. I’m sick of these counterfeiters making money off of people like this.”

-Steve

“I purchased a set of irons online a year ago that were supposedly legitimate. I thought I got a great deal, but when they arrived and I opened the box, I instantly realized they were fake. It definitely wasn’t the best deal I thought it would be.”

-Ben

“My nephew was about to buy some clubs from an online store, but the website had no contact address or phone number. And when you clicked the email link, it defaulted to a different company email address. When I went to that website I was redirected to your site. Because of you guys my nephew didn’t get stuck with fake golf clubs. Keep up the good work! Thanks.”

-Michael

“A few years ago, I bought a driver from a website as a gift for my husband. At the time I thought I was getting a steal of a deal. When I got it in the mail I was so excited to give it to him and when I did he was ecstatic. But when he went to play in a small tournament, he swung the club and the head flew off! I was so disappointed that I had bought my husband a fake club and it still irritates me to this day. So I just wanted to say, thank you doing what you do and shutting down websites like the one I ordered from. You have saved so many people from this frustration!”

-S.L.

I’ve been looking for a certain set of irons on various discount golf club websites and came across a website closed down by your group. I found it very helpful and it confirmed what was in the back of my mind; if it’s too good to be true then it probably is. Thanks for being on the lookout for these rogue sites. I’ll only buy from an authorized dealer now.

Paul

Share your counterfeit story by emailing us at
keepgolfreal@gmail.com

* By sharing your story with us you consent to allow us to use details of this story and your first name in order to help educate other consumers on the dangers of counterfeit golf products.

FAQ’S

What is the Golf Group doing to get rid of counterfeiting in golf?
It comes down to two things: education and enforcement.

Since forming the anti-counterfeiting group, we’ve worked with law enforcement officials around the world to conduct raids and shut this problem down at the source.

Education is as important to our efforts, because as long as people are willing to buy these fakes, counterfeiters will continue to make them. We are committed to educating golfers on the risks and pitfalls associated with these clubs. This website is just one part of our education efforts.

How are your efforts going?
We have seized millions of fake golf products over the years and continue to make progress in keeping counterfeit products out of the marketplace through our education and enforcement efforts. With the proliferation of peer-to-peer and other e-commerce websites, we are also dedicating more resources to internet investigations and have shut down thousands of websites trying to dupe consumers.

How can I be sure that I purchase authentic products?
The only way to be sure is to always buy your golf equipment from an authorized dealer.

I think I purchased fake clubs. What can I do?
First and foremost, contact the manufacturer. Going to the manufacturer opens a line of communication that can lead to a more comprehensive investigation. On each manufacturer’s website, there is a place to report suspected counterfeits:

If you purchased the products from a peer-to-peer e-commerce site, like eBay, file a dispute with the seller immediately. It’s also important to remember that counterfeiters are criminals. If you bought a fake product, these criminals have your credit card information. Be sure to diligently check your statement for fraudulent charges and report them if appropriate.

What should I do if I think a website might be selling fake clubs?
Let us know! Email the website’s URL to the group at keepgolfreal@gmail.com so we can investigate.

Why shouldn’t I buy a fake?
Fake clubs are made without the technical specifications and quality standards of professionally manufactured clubs. Counterfeit clubs are not only inauthentic, they’re inferior. The issues with counterfeit clubs can range anywhere from a loss of distance and accuracy to a safety issue — with shafts that shatter and heads that fly off mid-swing.

Where are fake clubs made?
About 90 percent of counterfeit clubs are made in China, but they can be made anywhere. Since the group’s inception, it has also investigated and raided counterfeit manufacturers in Thailand and Vietnam.

What is the Golf Group doing to get rid of counterfeiting in golf?
It comes down to two things: education and enforcement.

Since forming the anti-counterfeiting group, we’ve worked with law enforcement officials around the world to conduct raids and shut this problem down at the source.

Education is as important to our efforts, because as long as people are willing to buy these fakes, counterfeiters will continue to make them. We are committed to educating golfers on the risks and pitfalls associated with these clubs. This website is just one part of our education efforts.

How are your efforts going?
We have seized millions of fake golf products over the years and continue to make progress in keeping counterfeit products out of the marketplace through our education and enforcement efforts. With the proliferation of peer-to-peer and other e-commerce websites, we are also dedicating more resources to internet investigations and have shut down thousands of websites trying to dupe consumers.

How can I be sure that I purchase authentic products?
The only way to be sure is to always buy your golf equipment from an authorized dealer.

I think I purchased fake clubs. What can I do?
First and foremost, contact the manufacturer. Going to the manufacturer opens a line of communication that can lead to a more comprehensive investigation. On each manufacturer’s website, there is a place to report suspected counterfeits:

If you purchased the products from a peer-to-peer e-commerce site, like eBay, file a dispute with the seller immediately. It’s also important to remember that counterfeiters are criminals. If you bought a fake product, these criminals have your credit card information. Be sure to diligently check your statement for fraudulent charges and report them if appropriate.

What should I do if I think a website might be selling fake clubs?
Let us know! Email the website’s URL to the group at keepgolfreal@gmail.com so we can investigate.

Why shouldn’t I buy a fake?
Fake clubs are made without the technical specifications and quality standards of professionally manufactured clubs. Counterfeit clubs are not only inauthentic, they’re inferior. The issues with counterfeit clubs can range anywhere from a loss of distance and accuracy to a safety issue — with shafts that shatter and heads that fly off mid-swing.

Where are fake clubs made?
About 90 percent of counterfeit clubs are made in China, but they can be made anywhere. Since the group’s inception, it has also investigated and raided counterfeit manufacturers in Thailand and Vietnam.

CONTACT US

Have a question about counterfeits? Want to report a website or retailer? Connect with us below.

15 + 13 =

OUR MEMBERS

U.S. GOLF MANUFACTURERS ANTI-COUNTERFEITING WORKING GROUP